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Florida Homestead Exemptions

Sure there’s the $50,000 Standard Exemption. But did you know that there are actually dozens more? Did you know that all senior citizens with income under about $30k get another $50,000 exemption, and some senior citizens are completely exempt from having to pay property taxes. There are exemptions for disabled persons, veterans, active duty deployed servicepersons, homes damaged by named storms or catastrophes, surviving spouses of first responders and the list goes on!

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Blindness

If you are blind then you get a $500 exemption. This requires that you file in addition to the DR501 one of the following: (i) a Certificate from the Division of Blind Services, (ii) a Certificate from the Veteran’s Administration, (iii) a Certificate from the Social Security Administration, or the DR416 or DR416B (for Blind Exemption). Note: If you are Blind and also considered Totally and Permanently Disabled, then you may be eligible for the Totally and Permanently Disabled Exemption as well.

Totally and Permanently Disabled

If you are totally and permanently disabled you get a $500 exemption. This requires that you submit either the DR416 “Physician’s Certification of Total and Permanent Disability” Form, or the DR416B "Optometrist's Certification of Total and Permanent Disability" (due to blindness) Form. NOTE: If you are totally and permanently disabled in certain categories, and your income is below the level fixed by the Department of Revenue each year ($29,948), you may be eligible for a complete exemption from payment of property taxes- please see below.

Quadriplegic

This Exemption exempts you from having to pay any property tax at all. It requires that you submit two DR416 “Physician’s Certification of Total and Permanent Disability” Forms.

Other Total and Permanent Disabilities

If you are a paraplegic, a hemiplegic, or are otherwise totally and permanently disabled as defined in Florida Statute 196.012(11) and must use a wheelchair for mobility or you are legally blind, AND your income is below that amount set by the Florida Department of Revenue ($29,948), then you are eligible for a complete exemption from payment of Property Taxes. You must submit a DR501A form complete exemption subject to income limitation for hemiplegic, paraplegic, wheelchair required, or legally blind, and two DR416 or DR416B (for Blind Exemption) Forms, or a Certificate from the Veteran’s Administration

Disabled Veteran, 65 or older

If you are a veteran aged 65 or older and you were honorably discharged and have a permanent combat-related disability, then you are exempt from paying property taxes on your homestead property in the same percentage that you are permanently disabled. So if you are 20% permanently disabled, you only have to pay 80% of the property taxes that you would pay otherwise. This exemption does NOT carry over to a surviving spouse. This exemption requires that you file form DR501, proof of age, a Rating Decision from the Veteran’s Administration, file a DD-214, provide documentation of your Combatrelated disability, Proof of Honorable Discharge, and a Form DR501DV.

Veteran Disabled 10% or more

If you are a Disabled Veteran with a service-connected disability of 10% or more, then you will get a $5,000 exemption. This exemption requires that you file the Form DR501 and provide a letter from the Veteran’s Administration. This exemption also carries over to an un-remarried surviving spouse.

Disabled Veteran confined to wheelchair, service connected

If you are an honorably discharged veteran who has a service-connected total (but not necessarily permanent) disability, and you are required to use a wheelchair for mobility, and you receive financial assistance due to a disability that requires specially adapted housing, then you are exempt from payment of all property taxes on your homestead property. There are no income limitations for this exemption. This will require that you file a DR501 and a Letter from the US Government or VA attesting to the disability. This disability can carry over to an un-remarried surviving spouse as well.

Totally and Permanently Disabled Veterans

If you are a veteran who was honorably discharged with a service-connected total and permanent disability, then you are exempt from payment of all property tax on your homestead property. There are no income limitations for this exemption. The un-remarried spouse of such a veteran is also eligible for this exemption. This exemption requires filing a DR501 and a Letter from the Veteran’s Administration.

Granny Flat Exemption

If you have built on an addition or made renovations to your homestead property to provide living quarters for one or more natural or adoptive parents or grandparents, then you may be eligible to receive an exemption of the LESSER or (i) the increased value from the addition/renovation, or (ii) 20% of the total assessed property as improved. This exemption requires annual application and approval and ceases when the grandparent or parent no longer lives on the property.

Surviving spouses of veterans

Surviving spouses of veterans who died from service-connected causes while on active duty are totally exempt from payment of property tax. This requires filing a DR501 and a Letter from the Veteran’s Administration which attests to the veteran’s death while on active duty.

Deployed Servicemembers

If you are a servicemember who was deployed outside of the US, Alaska, or Hawaii in support of a qualified military operation you may be eligible to receive an additional exemption based on the number of days you were deployed. For example, If you were deployed on such duty for 30% of the prior year, then you receive an additional exemption for 30% of the property taxes on your homestead that you would have otherwise paid. This exemption requires that you file a DR501 , DR501M, and proof of qualifying deployment, which includes the dates of deployment.

First responder totally and permanently disabled in the line of duty.

If you are a first responder in the state of Florida or a political subdivision of Florida, who is totally and permanently disabled as a result of injury sustained in the line of duty, then you are totally exempt from payment of property tax on your homestead property. This exemption requires that you file an Employer Certificate of Disability, and Documentation of total and permanent disability from the Social Security Administration or Fl Dept. of Revenue form.

Surviving Spouse of first responder who died in the line of duty.

If you are an un-remarried surviving spouse of a First Responder who died in the line of duty you are exempt from payment of all property taxes on your homestead property. You must have been permanent residents of the state of Florida on January 1st of the year that the first responder died. For this exemption you must submit a Letter from the state, political subdivision of the state, or other authority, which legally recognizes and verifies that the first responder died in the line of duty while employed as a first responder.

Seniors 65 years and older

NOTE: This exemption applies by local ordinance only, so if it was not adopted for your county or municipality, then it may not be available to you If you are 65 years of age or older, were living on your homestead property as of Jan. 1 of the year you file for this exemption, and had household income less than the amount set by the Florida Dept of Revenue ($30,721), you may be eligible for an additional exemption of up to $50,000.

Seniors and Low Income Seniors who maintain Long-Term residency

NOTE: This exemption applies by local ordinance only, so if it was not adopted for your county or municipality, then it may not be available to you. If you are 65 years of age or older, were living on your homestead property as of Jan. 1 of the year you file for this, had household income less than the amount set by the Florida Dept of Revenue ($30,721), and you have kept your permanent residency on the homestead property for at least 25 years and have a Market Value of less than $250,000, you may be entitled to a complete exemption from payment of all property taxes. This requires that you fill out Form DR501SC, DR-4506T, provide copies of income tax returns and Social Security 1099’s, other income statements, and an Affidavit which must be completed in the Property Appraiser’s office.

Widowed

If you are an un-remarried widower or widow, you get a $500 exemption. This exemption requires that you file a DR501 plus a copy of the Deceased spouse’s death certificate. Important Final